snowy trail signs

Trail Use and Uphill Access Policy

The terrain at Loon Mountain is located partially on private land and partially on White Mountain National Forest/US Forest Service (USFS) land. Loon Mountain Recreation Corporation operates on USFS land under a Ski Area Special Use Permit issued by USDA Forest Service. While recreating on these private and public lands, you must follow Loon Mountain rules and USFS restrictions and recommendations, including those summarized below. Violation of these rules may result in suspension of lift privileges or prosecution for a criminal offense.

The following summary of restrictions and recommendations for trail use and uphill access at Loon Mountain Resort is provided for your information and education; and in an effort to enhance the use of public lands by you and others. Other restrictions may exist at times. Thank you for your observance and cooperation.

Winter Use of Trails & Lifts

Use of lifts, trails and terrain at Loon Mountain during the operating season is granted to skiers and snowboarders with a valid lift ticket, season pass or uphill access ticket and with approved equipment that has appropriate and operational retention or braking devices.

Skiing and snowboarding on closed trails, terrain or features is prohibited. Open/closed status is indicated on posted snow reports, snow report posted on loonmtn.com and on the lighted lift/trail signs located at the base of the Gondola, Kancamagus Express Quad and the Lincoln Express Quad during operational hours.

No dogs are allowed on the mountain, except service dogs, which must be on a leash.

**NO SLEDDING IS ALLOWED ON LOON MOUNTAIN WITHIN THE SKI AREA BOUNDARY AT ANY TIME. **

NH law states that each person who participates in the sports of skiing, snowboarding, and snow tubing accepts as a matter of law, the dangers inherent in the sport, and to that extent may not maintain an action against the operator for any injuries which result from such inherent risks, dangers or hazards.' (NH Statute Title XIX, Chapter 225, Section A:24) Awareness, common sense, courtesy, respect for others and the natural environment will help you have a positive experience and may reduce your risk.

YOUR RESPONSIBILITY CODE

Observe and follow the code below and share with other skiers the responsibility for a great on-mountain experience. This is a partial list. Always be safety conscious.

  • Always stay in control and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  • People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  • You must not stop where you obstruct a trail or are not visible from above.
  • Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  • Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  • Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  • Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.


KNOW THE CODE – IT’S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.

SKI AREA BOUNDARY & TREE SKIING

Terrain beyond the ski area boundary, as indicated by signs and on the trail map, is not maintained or patrolled. It is unmarked and potentially hazardous with many obstacles. Loon invites skiers and riders to stay within its maintained boundaries. When you pass beyond the ski area boundary, you leave the area of ski patrol services. You are responsible for your own actions, your own rescue and the cost of your rescue. Persons proceeding beyond ski area boundaries do so at their own risk. Any person requiring evacuation or rescue beyond the ski area boundaries may be fined for reckless conduct under New Hampshire State Law RSA 153-A:24.

Authorized in-bounds tree terrain is marked with trail signs and is indicated as open or closed on the snow report and on the hill by ropes and signage. Tree areas are not maintained or patrolled. Please be aware that tree areas may contain hazards that are not marked and may be hard to see. Respect your ability level. If you are wondering whether or not you should attempt something, err on the side of caution.

UPHILL TRAVEL POLICY

ALL UPHILL TRAVEL IS AT YOUR OWN RISK.

**ACCESS TO THE MOUNTAIN IS PERMITTED TWO HOURS PRIOR TO OPERATING HOURS AND DURING OPERATING HOURS ONLY. **

Loon Mountain allows uphill access via skinning or snowshoeing during the winter operating season two hours prior to operating hours and during posted operating hours. For the safety of everyone on the mountain, anyone participating in these activities must adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. You must have a valid season pass or day ticket. If you do not intend to ride a lift at any point during the day, you must purchase an Uphill Access day ticket for $20, available at the Octagon Snowsports Desk.
  2. Uphill travel equipment is required to have metal edges, a restraining device or brakes and an industry-approved binding. (AT skis, telemark skis, splitboards and snowshoes are all OK. Cross-country skis are not allowed.)
  3. The routes of uphill travel are from Lower Picked Rock to Grand Junction to Upper Bear Claw to Exodus; and Cruiser on South Peak. Snowshoers on South Peak must travel across Tote Road to Upper Bear Claw to Exodus to the Gondola summit and ride the Gondola down. Stay to the side of the trail and constantly be aware of what is happening around you. Uphill travel is only allowed on these two designated routes.
  4. Downhill snowshoeing is not permitted at any time. Snowshoers must travel to the Gondola summit and ride the Gondola down. 
  5. If you skin up and descend prior to operating hours, you must travel down along the same route you traveled up. Downhill snowshoeing is not permitted at any time.
  6. All trails and terrain parks are closed outside of operational hours, with the exception of the designated uphill routes two hours prior to opening.
  7. You must be visible to all traffic at all times, and you should know and follow ‘Your Responsibility Code’ at all times.
  8. No dogs are allowed on the mountain, except service dogs, which must be on a leash.
  9. Overnight stays on the mountain are not permitted.
  10. Ski Patrol reserves the right to close the mountain at any time. If the mountain is closed to uphill traffic, a sign will be placed at the base of each authorized uphill route.
  11. SLEDDING IS NOT PERMITTED ON ANY PART OF LOON MOUNTAIN AT ANY TIME.
  12. The mountain is closed and cleared of all guests and staff at the end of each operating day.

If you access the mountain during the two hours prior to operating hours, you do so at your own risk. Conditions may be variable, due to weather, ungroomed surfaces and limited visibility. Uphill users are warned that snowmobiles, snowmaking, snow grooming, winch cables and other equipment may be encountered at any time and that you are responsible to stay clear of such equipment. Use extra caution and always remain aware of what is happening around you.

Bright Clothing, Reflective Materials & Headlamps: It is strongly recommended that all uphill users wear brightly-colored clothing and have reflective material on clothing, poles or packs to heighten visibility. Flashing lights, such as those commonly used by bicycle riders, make it easy for other users and ski area personnel to see you. Use extra caution if you are descending in the dark or in low light conditions.

Uphill Travel Routes: Be aware of other skiers, riders and vehicles approaching you. Stay to the side of the authorized uphill routes and avoid spots where you may not be visible. When descending, please be aware and considerate of other users and ski area personnel.

Winch Cat Operations: Avoid all grooming operations and especially winch cats. The cable between the anchor and the cat can be difficult to see and may be under the snow. These cables can stretch for thousands of feet and can move very quickly.

Rescue Response: Be aware that there are no patrol services outside of operating hours, and ski area buildings are closed. In case of emergency, call 911 and know that response times could be extended. Be aware that mobile phone service can be unreliable on the mountain.

Posted: 12/28/13
Updated: 01/15/17